Lone Gram fotograferet af Bax LIndhardt

Lone Gram accepted into 'The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters'

Friday 09 Oct 20

Contact

Lone Gram
Professor
DTU Bioengineering
+45 45 25 25 86

Professor Lone Gram is one of 15 outstanding scientists to become new members of The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. They enter into a yearlong tradition, and follow in the footsteps of famous former members such as Niels Bohr and H.C. Ørsted, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein and Charles Darwin.

Lone Gram heads Section for Microbial and Chemical Ecology at DTU Bioengineering and is Center Leader for CeMiSt, a Center of Excellence funded by the Danish National Research Foundation.

"I look forward to learning more about all areas of excellent science and also to discussions about science policy and how we can facilitate and develop the very best science and scientists."
Professor Lone Gram, DTU Bioengineering

Throughout an impressive career, Professor Lone Gram has contributed to our understanding of microorganisms and how they both negatively and positively affect our lives. Her research has always focused on bacteria and has had two clear goals: to control, i.e. kill or inhibit disease-causing bacteria, and to enable biotechnological use of bacteria.

She is not only dedicated to her own research but also to the framework and environment surrounding science. This is evident from her many positions of trust, among them her current position as Deputy Chairman for the board of the Independent Research Fund Denmark. She is honored to be accepted into the The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and looks forward to the work:

“I look forward to learning more about all areas of excellent science and also to discussions about science policy and how we can facilitate and develop the very best science and scientists”, says Lone Gram.    

About The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters

The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters (Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab) was founded in Copenhagen on 13 November 1742 by King Christian VI when the King gathered together a group of experts to sort out his collection of medals. From this rather narrow interest, the Academy soon covered antiquities more generally, as well as mathematics, physics and natural history. Today it embraces all branches of science and scholarship and has about 250 Danish members and 250 foreign members.

The Academy’s fundamental purpose, as stated in the article 1 of the statutes: “is to strengthening of the position of scholarship in Denmark, particularly that of basic science and of the promotion of inter-disciplinary understanding. These objectives are to be archived by holding meetings and issuing publications through international collaboration and by consultative activities”.

Today the Academy also organizes many public lectures both with local scientists but also with outstanding international researchers within the natural sciences as well as the humanities and social sciences and the Academy both organizes and houses many symposiums.
Read more on the Academy's website.

https://www.food.dtu.dk/english/news/Nyhed?id=%7B0071A886-91B8-42F7-9911-4B388B534E71%7D
29 NOVEMBER 2020