Chemical analysis of food

Chemical data are of utmost importance to many of the activities at The National Food Institute. Therefore the institute operates and develops a significant infrastructure for chemical analysis of food. The institute’s analytical capabilities are based on high performance trace analyses covering most small molecules including residues, contaminants, natural products, vitamins, fatty acids, trace elements and nanoparticles in foods and biological matrices. A particular focus is on compounds of concern to human health. Furthermore, metabolic and metabolomics studies in health and toxicology is within the scope of the infrastructure. 

Analytical infrastructure 

The analytical infrastructure is based on modern mass spectrometry and includes more than 20 active mass spectrometers, which represent almost all relevant techniques. They serve as the backbone for all analyses together with modern chromatographic techniques and sample purification procedures.

Quantitative analysis

The core expertise is validated quantitative analysis at trace levels of a wide range of compounds in food, ranging from residues and contaminants to vitamins and natural products. In recent years, screening analysis and metabolomics based on accurate mass spectrometry have been implemented in most analytical areas. A specific analytical example is determination of degradation products in edible oils and foods caused by lipid oxidation and formation of volatile oxidation products with undesirable flavour and health effects.

More recently we have included research in authenticity of food as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, and detection and determination of size distribution of nanoparticles using single-particle ICP-MS.

DANAK accredited reference laboratory

The National Food Institute is accredited according to ISO 17025 by the Danish Accreditation Fund, DANAK for a wide range of chemical analysis of food and is ISO 17043 accredited for the provision of proficiency testing (pesticides in cereals and feeding stuff). 

The National Food Institute is also national reference laboratory for most food contaminants on behalf of the Danish authorities in relation to the EU and plays a key part in the national food chemical contingency plan.

The institute is also EU reference laboratory for pesticides in cereals and feeding stuff.

 

FOR QUESTIONS ON

Trace analyses and screening using organic mass spectrometry
Jørn Smedsgaard

Trace elements and nanoparticles
 Jens Jørgen Sloth

Lipid oxidation
Charlotte Jacobsen

Contact

Jørn Smedsgaard
Professor, Head of Research Group
National Food Institute
+45 35 88 74 59

Contact

Jens Jørgen Sloth
Head of Research Group, Senior Researcher
National Food Institute
+45 93 51 88 57

Contact

Charlotte Jacobsen
Professor, Head of Research Group
National Food Institute
+45 23 27 90 75
http://www.food.dtu.dk/english/service/about-the-institute/facilities-and-infrastructure/chemical-analysis-of-food
22 OCTOBER 2018